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nkel follows the second ever treat on c- max next, a discussion of the state of american education. then connecticut governor donal malloy talks about early childhood education programs in his state. speaksan manuel santos about his country' trade agreement with the u.s.. >> in a recent ranking of students around the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn to turn mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law form -- law firm for several years. she taught in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the
coalition now? >> ok, so when you poll the public on things like education, jobs -- people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at doug sosnik's recent blog post, which i think was not in "atlantic" but in "politico"? sorry. i think it is totally right that one of the great unifying factors in this country was if you work hard, and play by a set of fairness rules, you should do ok. and our guidepost was -- are our kids, the next generation, are they doing better than we are? that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in 2013, chris christie won in new jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. terry mcauliffe won in virginia, walsh in boston, deblasio in new york. toledo, the person who was pro- public education -- >> could you speak up? >> sorry. the person who was pro-education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have grea
income students who were pursuing a higher education was less than half of today. we'll cut the gap between lower and upper income students. making agrant is livesence to millions of has been discussed in reference to access. pell grant recipients have less than this. after you add scholarship aid or what ever they are expected to -- out of your park it pocket, he still has $11,000 to pay for one year of higher education. their feeling that with loans, additional work, eating ramen noodles. the students are living on the edge. if you do not cut pell grant funding, the students in the range, you run two major risks. some will not pursue higher education. are a number of students are academically prepared to go to four-year institutions while under much down to two-year areitutions where they substantially less likely to complete. in doing with the long-term i think this is appropriate and targeted spending reductions in areas that are not linked to needy students are directly. and pursues a ribbon. i have listed a host of offset options in my testimony. i will just throw out one with
over education and how it is affecting all students next. we all have our little tricks. mom swaps one of my snacks for a yoplait. i don't mind, i mean it's orange crème. and when mom said bobby was too edgy... 'sup girl. i just swapped him out for tyler. 'sup girl. mom never questioned bobby again. two can play at this game. [ female announcer ] swap one snack a week for a yoplait. and everybody wins. yoplait. it is so good. >>> now an investigation into spending your tax dollars, parents taking to the courtroom to get help for kids in the classroom. found some of the bay area's most vulnerable students not getting the basic education they deserve. it is an issue affecting all students in public schools. >> i went to the school begging for help. >> and the school district fought us tremendously. >> it is an overwhelming process. >> reporter: for parents of students with disabilities getting public education their children are promised can be contentious. about one in ten students receive special education. >> can you put it on the first tape? >> reporter: almost 700,000 kids each yea
people have posted on my facebook page. i hear you support common core education standards. i'll nev watch your show again. another said, if you support common core, you have hoes -- you've lost my trust. another one, you need to learn the truth about common core. the person who said he never would wah my show again won't hear this and that's too bad. i want to cut to the chase itch don't support what common core has become in many states or school districts. i'm dead set against the federal government creating a uniform curriculum for any subject. i oppose the collectio of personal data on students that would identify them and then track them, and certainly any effort to give that personal information to the federal government. i am steadfast in my belief that parents, parents, should ultimately decide. the best for their children's education, whether it's public schools, private schools, religious schools, or home schools. i believe education is a local or state function, not a federal one. sadly, the very label, common core, has come to be associated with things i detest, like age
. you picked the passion, education. this wonderful line is when you were in high school, a tough neighborhood in north phillie, where we grew up, irish somehow, black, and very tough, and it's a tough rundown neighborhood, the whole place, and you were talking to the kids, african-american kids there, wondering why you are the highest paid writer in the world, you tried to get their interest, right way to do it, i think. i'm more me than they are them. explain that about your success as a writer that you're more yourself than most people are themselves, or at least you delve deeper into what that is and how that took you to education as a passion. >> some of them were excited, some were not, trying to be provocative, so i said something provocative. i said, word for word, i'm the highest paid writer in the world, and they sat up. okay. all the teachers in the back stood up too. i said, why is that? how do you think that happened? they said, luck? yes, that's possible, luck's involved for sure, and they said, you know somebody? actually, no, we're all indians, no, we don't know an
. they had been offering a manufacturing education program for 12 years and had 98% to 100% placement rate. we have 12 community colleges. it makes no sense in a state that is number two per capita in submarines and construction. almost all of it is high-value added as opposed to lower value added. we were not reshaping our schools to produce the human capital. >> did you find out why not? >> yes, it was outside the box. it was outside people's educational box. we now have added three additional community colleges. that model is being used to rebuild the high schools, which the state runs. yes, we are changing. >> thank you, i really appreciate it. i want to thank you for all the school safety measures. rick alluded to secretary duncan's piece. has the federal government become irrelevant to the work you are doing, or is there a role the federal government can play that complements your role? -- complements the role the state and local government can play? >> let's go back to the comments about the $100 million grant program. even if you don't get one of those grants, it is a learning expe
. some example would be say for sex education shown to be more important for things like unwanted pregnancies or preventing stds. similarly the use of save injection sites it is for the prevention of blood diseases being triumphed. how is this relevant to the admit life community. this is a nonprofit that was founded in 1998 by the members of the night life community. we focus on harm production and the night life scene. we see a big issue with hearing production and hearing loss people are being exposed to high levels of sound more than once a week so we'll go to event and have a booth fair and have things like pass out earplugs and what you can do it prevent this going forward >> we also see a big problem with unsafe sex in the night life community because people lack knowledge or means for that. and to that end we provide condoms and we lost see lots of issues about over heating and we try to provide free water at venues where waters is not given out. and we found things like information for heatstroke for daytime festivities people don't know they've over heating. we see a hu
'll sort the truth from the spin. >>> plus, new global education rankings once again show american students lagging. so just how worried should we be? and china flexes its military muscle as vice president joe biden visits the region. will the u.s. stand firm with japan as tensions rise? >> obviously the website, when it was first launched, wasn't in tip-top shape, to say the least. but we have been 24/7 going at it and now for the vast majority of users it's working. so i'm going to need you all to share the word about how the affordable care act really works, what its benefits are, what its protections are and, most importantly, how people can sign up. >> welcome to "the journal editorial report." that was president obama at the white house youth summit pitching the revamped whitehouse.gov website. they are touting this week's rising enrollment numbers and to sell it to a still skeptical public. is obama care on the road to recovery? let's ask joe rag go, deputy editor dan and kim. so joe, has obama care turned the corner here, as the white house says. >> they'd love to make you think tha
of flexibility to address certain problems. how do we make sure the student gets the cost of education? how do we address time demands? i believe that is one of the areas that has changed the most, the extent to which athletes are tied up in athletic preparation. we need to make sure students are not exploited. how do we address that? how do we address lifetime educational benefits? if we do get the right political restructuring that would allow us to address it, if we do not do that, that is on us. i was sorry to see nfl europe go away. everybody can bring a lawsuit, that is the american way. the courts decide what they decide. while you are in the system, you ought to know what the rules are when you come in. we have work to do in that area. i like for 18- and 19-year-old young people to have a choice. we ought to do we can to make it the best educational and athletic experience that we can. the agents oftentimes view these kids as future clients. maybe they can provide the support to train them. that is what a lot of them want. if they want to be in college, that is terrific. >> what is the bi
studies institute, isi. for those of you who may be new to us isi is a national education organization founded in 1953 and philadelphia and headquartered since 1996 on centerville rd. in greenville. isi's mission is to educate for liberty, inspiring college students to discover, embrace and advance the principles and virtues that make america free and prosperous. with the thousands of student and faculty members on virtually every college campus in the country, isi each year produces a class of young and energetic leaders who, thanks to isi programs and publications embark on their careers with a particularly deep understanding of and commitment to the american ideal of ordered liberty. isi and the conducts over 200 educational programs around the country including lectures, debates, conferences seminars and summer schools. isi also offers fellowships for aspiring college teachers. through our collegiate member we support dozens of newspapers. we also publish the quarterly journal and under our imprint isi books we have -- the general reader soft on penetrating conservative insights of
that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care. for a community that views her future as their own that should bother all of us. >> i warns about the the dangers of the country of a growing inequality and a record income gap. the president argued that decade's long shift in the economy has undermind all groups poor and middle class that now face the same problems once attributed to inner city minority groups. one prescription is the height to the federal minimum wage now at 7.25 per hour. >> i'm going to keep pushing till we get a higher minimum wage for hard working american across the country. it will be good for the economy and our families. >> president made his call one day before thousands of fast food workers in 100 cities nationwide walked off the job on thursday in protest of low pay. these workers want a minimum wage hike to $15 per hower, higher than what the democrats want in the state at $10 an hour. president obama supports the 10.10 hike. congress has not raised the wage since 2009 on the legislation passed with george w. bush was president. >> is an inc
have been older workers, workers of color and workers with less education. and that's not particularly surprising because these are the workers who, even in a robust economy, experience the greatest difficult in getting jobs in the first place for a variety of reasons including discrimination. the very fact of long-term unemployment is affecting these workers' ability to get new jobs. i know many of you are co-sponsors on legislation that would prohibit discrimination against the long-term unemployed which is certainly a measure we would also encourage you to take up as soon as you can. but today's focus is obviously on extending the benefits. finally, i want to stress again the importance of renewing the program, not just because of the workers who will be affected, and you will hear from them, but for the economy overall, for the labor market overall and for our society overall. as congressman levin again pointed out this morning, we know that unemployment insurance is one of the most effective economic stimuli that we have. cbo said if the program is renewed, it could account for as
on the 2020 we need to look at things like education. europe in establishing its system it has now implemented education at every school level to help people learn from a early age the rules of safe bicycling and the process of doing that. we need something and spend more money with the school district. it won't be funded out of the school district or the superintendent office. i think we need to integrate our education system. law enforcement -- i have sat through meetings and i know you have and enforcement needs help. they're not going to fund themselves for the things that need to be done and the grand juries and everything else and the board needs to include this in the strategic plan of what you're doing in that area. we also need to do a lot more in advocacy and evangelicism as far as it goes and i will make one final comment. students are thinking about their future life in terms of driving or their transportation decisions. if we can cover in education the last three years we can get them out of the situation where they may make the mistake of getting a car, depending on a car,
, prosperous, and out of jail is education. it is a tricky business. what we have is not working. it may not be a magic list that will make our schools the best, but what we can do and what we need to do is expand the options, more choices for people, have to be better. the best way to provide education is through competition and school choice, just vouchers, charter schools. we need and all the above strategy, less mandates from washington, more local control. we need to give people flexibility when it comes to where they send their kids to school. a pastor says school choice is a civil rights issue. he might be right. we are part of the country that tries school choice as benefits, especially minorities. too much the government says here is a school in your district, it is failing, tough luck. people in detroit have had enough of this. 80% percent of the parents in detroit would have enough choice would take another choice. families want the freedom to choose to send their kids were they would like to send them. i want them to have as many choices as possible. i live where public schoo
. this morning, i was with state smart moscone and talking about the preschool education and the quality of it so we can get to the kids early. i know it's not loss on us when we have child adverse family life if they're not reading well by third grade and if they don't graduate from college their customers for the da. thankfully preschool enrollment in san francisco is 84 percent and hopefully getting an early investment in those kids will save us in the public safety realm because it costs over $50,000 a year to house someone in jail. we're trying to get it going in the right direction. we did a lot of thanksgiving things my arm hurts from kaifrgz we did the salvation army and we are that out on thanksgiving morning for the elderly more turkey carving and serving meals that were not around and two folks came back into retirement and normally chief fong was there we hope she had a good thanksgiving somewhere else. this weekend i think the bad kid thing was a great thing we didn't plan to get that big but we're are not only to keep the folks save. to that end we'll do something with make a wish a
the variety of views we had for instance when the heritage foundation -- heritage was about education reform and getting a lot of different conservatives together. they would fight like heck about the best way forward on education reform, the best way forward on tax reform. jack kempe would have horrible fights with phil gramm and others and then they would come together and come up with a tax reform plan. there were to be constant battles on the budget. there were a lot of different ways forward in the conservatives we believe even into the 90s, 1994 we always talked about a legislative laboratory of ideas and you talked about the place of ideas and we talked about the free marketplace of ideas. we would close the doors and go downstairs and debate nonstop among ourselves until we came up with the best plan for reform moving for it. just not the case anymore. if you veer off the path a little bit to the right or a little bit to the left there are ideological witch hunts and people suggesting you are insufficiently conservative and insufficiently republican. that is the 9% party. that's the
educate. he was the most educated candidate they ever had to try to move voters to a new place. >> you mentioned the learning. and gay mcdougall, you campaigned to release him from prison. he used the time in prison to be educated as well. >> absolutely. he used it to be educated and educated the other prisoners. he called it the university of robben island. they spent time learning about political development around the world. they decided who they, as a political party and as, you know, activists, wanted to be. the decisionmaking. when they finally emerged, from that prison, they knew exactly the road they wanted to travel. >> and jendayi frazer, he was conscious of his role as educator when he became president and after he left office as well. didn't often hide disappointment in what was going on in south africa and other african nations. >> yes, he certainly was. i think president mandela, what i took from him was the courage of his convictions. he was very clear when he did not agree. he would do that privately and publicly. for instance, on the issue of hiv and aids, he certainly
. if you want to get ahead in our country is through education. so many people in our big cities are being short changed by a bad school system. we want to make it better through competition, by giving every kid the choice. part of our economic freedom zones is that federal money that comes to detroit isn't going to the school system directly but to the kid and their parents and each parent will decide which school they want to take their money to. >> it's a plan that touches regulation and education as well. >> absolutely. >> obama care, all over the news recent obviously for obvious reasons. we had heard this week that fox news was reporting that senator harry reid exempted some of his staff from signing up for obama care. have you signed up and how was that experience for you? >> don't get me started. i'm still in a bad mood from doing that. i spent two hours on wednesday doing it. i had all of my information in, all of my most personal information so i hope they're not hacking into this from all over the country. i put all my information in and then i pushed the button to sign up for a
educate people that we know nothing about those drugs for the most part and, you know, they might have a psych actually effects as a result of mixing them with other drugs >> commissioner joseph. >> just one other question you mentioned in your presentation smoking. we the entertainment commission there's no smoking allowed inside of public buildings and very often night clubs have smoking sections and now w you have to be a certain amount of feet away from 9 doors of establishment. how do we reduce smoking or how do businesses deal with the infiltration of smoke coming into the building >> decreasing smoking is a difficult task. the primary reason they've got cigarettes that are artifical and their illegal in clubs and businesses and they don't cause second-hand smoke that's one of the primary drivers of not allowing smoking inside. potentially advocating for using e cigarettes is one way to prevent smoking from bag as prominent. i've seen many, many people are switching to e cigarettes now. >> thank you very much. >> any other comments from commissioners. commissioner lee. >>
the battles over bilingual education, the idea that we should be dealing with each other in two languages. well, i've just been spending a ton of time in a place where i only speak one of 11 official languages, right? so you go to a place, there's a wonderful place if newtown -- in newtown, this part of johannesburg that kind of helps represent this hybridizing, modernizing, cultural place, a kind of african cosmopolitan place. it's a cafÉ where people come and do spoken word, sort of like louder than a bomb. except in five or six or seven languages. and, you know, you'll walk in there and somebody will begin a poem and then lapse into english. have a little zulu, go into afrikan and somehow that entire group of 300 people gets enough of the gist of what's going on to have the experience of that kind of cross-cultural exchange ing. that means people who grew up speaking 11 different languages are in the room together and having one conversation. so i think there's a ton that we have to learn about that. i think even though it will sound odd to say, i think we have a ton to learn about ho
back to your basic things, individual's abilities to aspire to their fullest potential. education is a major part of it. th is not obviously available to the extent it should be to help people overme the other limitationons. there are so many stctural problems that have to be addressed. we do not even get close to that with this spee. >> charles, according to a polling,g, most americans beliee the rich are geing cher, the poor arere getting poorer. 92% of democrats believe that. 50% of americans. it does s not help the republicans' image. talking about tting food stamps. >> i think the polls are right and obama has been over that gap. the memedian house hold come was $56,000. is $5252,500. there has been a drop in median income. while the rich have watched their stocks double since the day obama came into offe. on the one hand he has a fed pumping up, inflating the pricinof housing and ststock, deliberately by prting a trillion dollars a y year of money. and on the other hand we have a drdrop, and this is unprececede, a drop in the recovery. this has been going on -- >> excuse me.
solve that, we will have major advances and a new education and training center. >> and how is the investment focus, do you think, and the strategic focus, going to shift as we look beyond a steady state afghanistan operation? >> i think we will very -- nato was very wise to invest in command and control. command and control is absolutely crucial. and now, we have a new technology. we understand much better how we can interact at a distance. we must, as well, deploy some demand and control elements. and how we can empower, i who say, the strategy corporal in the field, with the new technology. so we have a lot of things. in terms of the country as well. and certainly in the air/land domain, how we work again better together. we improve the efficiency. and the keys are the joint intellnnceg of everything. and afterwards, selective measures, selective effects to reach the best level of efficiency, i would say, on the realm, depending on the effects that we are really expecting from those system, those people, those men and women. >> you just had an industry day. have you been
and environmental education is important because nature food is going 80 good for the food instead of candy. my efforts are to care for your environment people can walk here. this is the kind of return on our environment it is changing the world focus >> thank you for your effort (clapping.) good evening. i'm lee avenue i'm a third jashgs resident from bayview hunter point. about four and a half years it was fund by department of the environment. it's designed to help low income homeowners reduce their electricity bills and provide volunteers with hands on green job training to help them more marbleable in the workforce. they wanted someone from the bayview hunter point to help them. the goals was 10 homes in one year. one of my first clients has been crucial to the success of this program. she encompass around city hall waving her $4 bill and letting everyone or everyone know the benefits. over the past years her effort has helped us install over 1 point and 64 solar pages it's $3.3 million in energy savings that 26 thousands of hours of job training and over 10 thousand emissions prevented
they do. >> in some of the tweets waj was reading do you think there should be mandatory education for kids so she really understand what they're getting in to when they're online? >> i actually think that's a great idea. some people are initiated in the ways of the web. it would be great to have some guidelines and a few stops to look to chart it. i'm not convinced that people will look at kids being dumb online and see it as so different from kids being dumb off line. maybe as the internet penetrates our lives more and more, we'll have a sense of that's what kids do, and that's fine. >> meg, how does this compare to some of the legislation that is proposed in the e.u. right now? >> the update to the data protection regulation or the data protection directive '95 includes a right to be forgotten regardless of age. they talked about the data controller being obligated by the data subject upon request to delete information that identifies the data subject. the way it is written it is not restricted to things that you post, that you can take down. it reaches information that is about
suggested that infrastructure is important but education and advocacy is a critical part of it as well. next speaker and if there is anyone else that would like to speak, anyone that has been called or anyone else come forward now. we're going to close public comment in a moment. >>i am jazz [inaudible] and a a lot year resident of san francisco and i would like to echo the statements of the last speaker. i feel so much is going to be window dressing. i know i have spoken to you in the past. if you want the improvements you need to get absolutely radical on this. the whole stop sign thing is a disaster with cycling. you are encouraging cyclists to break the law every time or in a position of breaking the law. if you know about cycling the energy you need to use when you get going. it makes the journey stilted. it takes longer. if you want to have a smooth flow of cyclistses than reorder the junctions or at least provide corridors and what we have at portland and seattle and minneapolis we have the space in terms of wide avenues and boulevards and also we have the other advantage is th
pr and a push to get young folks engaged in the process and education is going to be the key way to solving the low enrollment and lack of enthusiasm around the law. >> not enough pr, that is what we're hearing this morning. i'll let you respond to that. also, as part of the polling, this comes from united technologies congressional connection poll. about -- actually, more than half of these young people, 18 to 29 who were surveyed said, they actually think the law is going to get repealed. whether that's reality or not, it's the perception. if they think that after three-plus years of what most of us would argue there's been pr, how in the world do you convince them at this point to sign up? >> absolutely, shannon. i think what this really shows is millenials are a whole lot smarter than president obama thinks they are. they have looked at the choices and, as this poll shows, they are not really interested. he catapulted to his presidency by taking this group of people for granted and as much as i think young people want to see some sort of health care reform, they are not reall
their families. it's not easy for roma children in the czech education system. according to much in every below but it's not just because their parents don't always look after them properly. it all she tells me the state must do more to promote integration. rachel tells me that recently check education authorities ask them to count the roma children. it's the will that mean it. if it down yet they want us to judge which children were roma and which were not on the basis of their physical appearance. why did you react and haven't heard anything since then. education authorities put the scheme on ice because of the criticism it received from many teachers. one year ago police said was to not go up and started the pilot project roma like elena by nova and carl someone for being trained a special police officers in an attempt to combat rising crime the city's ombudsman for minorities. pablo books of the lake. helped initiate the project. he believes there will be less friction at the crime rate among the roma falls. so what do we knew we wanted to use the hatred all of the roma police officers are
talks about education in the u.s.. >> being lady like does not require silence. why should my husband's job or yours prevent us from being ourselves? i do not believe that being first lady should prevent me from expressing my ideas. [applause] >> betty ford spoke her mind, pro choice and a supporter of the equal rights amendment. she and gerald ford openly discussed her experience with breast cancer. for much of her family's public life she struggled with alcohol and drug dependency and confronting it defined her post white house years. >> welcome to first ladies influence and image. tonight we'll tell you the story of elizabeth ford, the wife of president gerald ford. here to tell her story is richard norton smith. you know him, he's one of our academic advisors for the whole project. he's helped launch a number of presidential libraries among them the gerald r. ford library in michigan. you developed a relationship with the fords so you bring that to the table. >> sure. i try to be as objective as possible. but i was very fortunate to become a good friends of both of the fords. >> w
parents or you paid $80,000 for an education. that's the reality the millennials face, lou. i said this in the break. no matter what people want to call obama or his policies or what's going on, it's the results and the current results we're dealing with. if you don't see upward mobility, you can't have the apartment you want, date the boy or girl you want or build something for your own future if you want a family. that's reality for millennials. >> politically these numbers are interesting. they cause great cause for concern. obama won this group, 29 and under, by massive majorities. they thought because obama is so hip and cool and the jay z connection and wearing the ipod, they would be able to lock in this generation as a democratic voting ajority. if you can get them young and usually that's their voting identity for the rest of theirs lives. they realize the debt is going to be on them. the cost of obama care is going to be on them. they're saying we don't cessarily want any part of this. this is not what we signed up for. >> millennials identifying by a very narrow margin,
] public a better educated about what the options are and that certainly is a major rarity of the cfp board to increase the standard of professionalism in the financial planning industry. the family do go to and friends but they also go to themselves. we saw that. that was interesting in the polls. to me it is the same issue if i were to ask this room how many of you are above average drivers. [laughter] you'd find that more than 50% of you would raise your hands, but if you are a statistician, you know that the answer is that you are not. so i think people are more confident in their abilities, maybe they are -- maybe they should be. people do need advice and it is our job at the board to make sure that is top-flight advice. >> if i could pick up on that, i was surprised by the conference withpeople said they had their ability to make financial decisions. i see an opportunity which some of our companies are using to leverage social media to get the information out in the community of people that you trust. we have seen a number of new financial advisory tools that are based on seating good
between education defense and for her, unemployment benefits is important. we need to pass the budget either way. whether this is included or not. >> one way or the other you are right about that. t i wasn't joking about the good quality and the fact that republicans and democrats respect you. it is still the hatfield and mccoy's in washington and i'm wondering how this president is a good example of that. will this be the way it's going to be for the next three years? the president is a friend of yours, does it come up like health care is a disaster, it might get better and it might t, but we have a lot of people paying a lot more with premiums and we have 5 million fewer with insurance and when this thing started. so this is what it's going to be. three years of this. >> two different points he made. one is can they get together to do a budget plan. i think that they are both well-respected and smart. and i think that they can split the difference and come in at a couple hundred million over the next two years and get rid of the stupid sequester and try to move forward and get defen
cahealth care a education, we're still in it but it's just changed phases. >> one of the things that has to change, and one of the things professor ogletree said about him being a patriot, it is a much different world then than it is now. the great cold war was on at that time and the south african government was aligned with the united states. and people who were seeing that struggle were seeing the south african government as an ally of the united states and not paying enough attention to the big human rights issues. but the big issue going forward now is president zuma in south africa now and does he get the lessons from the life and leadership of president mandela and other leaders in africa, and not just that continent but around the world that they can take something away from that. there are not going to be a lot of people dancing in the streets because they're mourning the loss of mugabwe, for example, next door, but i hope the lesson this week and the days to come, that people will see the real value of the kind of leadership that was not self-centered and it was not based on di
and education tax credits and loosen visa rules to encourage entrepreneurs to open businesses. while those are all good ideas, you've got to pour more government money into those inner cities if you're going to make a difference. >> well, chris, it hasn't worked. the president pours a trillion dollars into the nation's economy when you divided it out, it was about $400,000 per child. the problem with a government stimulus is you pick the winners and loser rs. with this stimulus i'm talking about, a free market stimulus, you simply leave the money in the hands of those who have earned it, so the customers have pickeded out the successful people. those people get more money. like i met a young man, young african man who has his own restaurant. his first question is do you have any tax breaks for me for my business. that's what what would do. help people in business and trying. >> but i don't have to tell you senator, republicans have a steep hill to climb in inner city neighborhoods. in detroit in november, 97% of detroit voters supported president obama. 2% voted for rom thi. the black unem
contribute education to this burgeoning field of obscure difficult to understand area. >> let's try to understand. you get back from your honeymo honeymoon. you marry becky, and you get back and you try to pay for everything with bit coin. first how do you get food. how do you get gas. >> our first task was how to get home from the airport. we had to rely on educating people, persuading people to accept bit coin. when we started there was only one establishment in the entire state of utah where h we live tt used bit coin. we had to approach merchant, have you heard of bit coin. can we pay you with this digital currency. >> you managed to get some groceries. a gas station that was an hour away to get gas which somewhat defeats the purpose. but you managed to get those essentials. but now you decided you're going to have this three-month trip around the world. you're going to start from prove alprovoall the way to new york. how did you do that. >> we had to rely on the bit community. gas stations are owned by big oil companies. they're not interested in a new way of paying. >> what di
to urge the california department of education to reconsider its recent decision to change the way that child care resource and referral program divides the service areas in san francisco. in san francisco, we have diversity in languages, cultures and the two service providers in san francisco, children's council and children services have both served the entire city of san francisco for 40 years and have worked out the best system for this. a system that is culturally sensitive. we are deeply concerned that changing the service area to divide the service area by zip codes will create inefficiency to families and to children seeking services. we want to ensure that no one is turned away for living in a different zip code if they choose one service provider over another. therefore, this resolution today is to call on the california department of education to keep the current determination of the service areas so that we can continue having efficient access for all of our children and families and i want to thank supervisor far more co-sponsoring this resolution. the rest i submit. >
who miss their way to school or simply didn't have access to secondary education the way to bounce back from this summer's that that is the job market with the digital springboard to take a look. that and it's tedious. in adults ages eighteen to twenty five come from deprived neighbourhoods aesthetic appearance. they don't have a diploma and has been an employee for quite awhile. herehey are given the chance to learn a new job during the whole year in a teaching tool industry. in a carnal man. i quit school after my junior year in high school. so i did not graduate can i struggled for four years. and then i worked in sales but then i got bored of them so i thought to myself it's time to find something that suits me. on top of it what's more he's young adults are hired by the association in pd about eight hundred and eighty euro zone month. in exchange their asked to design websites for commercial videos for companies. using computers is second nature to them as they were born in the digital era according to their supervisors all that's left to do is to pass on the known how one mor
efficiencies, how we support education. >> i want to get to that in a moment. you have a long, deeply personal relationship with howard that dates back 25 years, when you were just 16. tell us the story of what brought you to howard university. >> at the age of 16, i was probably 80 pounds. i suffered from sickle cell anemia. i came to howard university because howard had a sickle cell center. my mom, a nurse, thought it would be a safe place healthwise. the second reason is because i wanted to pursue becoming a physician. i looked across the spectrum of universities that would give me that opportunity, howard had the best fit. my former prime minister, founder, father of our nation, as it were, who brought us into independence was a political professor at howard university. it has a strong name in the caribbean and was a strong connection for me. >> you come from trinidad and tobego. >> that is correct. >> you are a surgical oncologist by training. are you still practicing? >> on a limited basis. my operating room, my classroom as it were, day-to-day activities of administration plus my skill
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
and education, we're still in it but it's just changed phases. >> one of the things that has to be learned, and one of the things professor ogletree said about him being a patriot, it is a much different world then than it is now. the great cold war was on at that time and the south african government was aligned with the united states. and people who were seeing that struggle were seeing the south african government as an ally of the united states and not paying enough attention to the big human rights issues. but the big issue going forward now is president zuma in south africa and does he get the lessons from the life and leadership of president mandela and other leaders in africa, and not just that continent but around the world that they can take something away from that. there are not going to be a lot of people dancing in the streets because they're mourning the loss of mugabwe, for example, next door, but i hope the lesson this week and the days to come, that people will see the real value of the kind of leadership that was not self-centered and it was not based on division but on
't about money. we spend plenty on money and number two is k-12 education. we are not the top 25, we are not the top 25 in k-12 education outcomes so it is not a matter of money you need to reengineer the system and i have a number of ideas about how to do that. >> maybe we will come back to that but there's a couple other bases i want to touch before i turn it over. under this broad entitlement reform, medicare is critical as you say. we also have social security. the other interesting chapter i think on what we should do to fix the social security system, say a little bit about that. >> in the scheme of things that should be easy. in the basketball and now the g8 should be a layup. you can miss the layup but on the other hand, with medicare and health care reform it is a three-point play for the opponent's basket. we have to dribble a little bit and take a few shots before we will put some points on the board. with social security we would have had competence in 1999 but for the blue dress incident. and it's not just a matter of what the reform ought to be that the process that you
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